2022 Annual ANCDS Scientific and Business Meeting

"Right Hemisphere Disorders"

Wednesday, November 16, 2022

In-Person Event
Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel
Two Poydras Street
New Orleans, Louisiana 70130 (MAP)
Lectures begin at 9:15 am CST

Schedule | Session Details | ASHA CEU InformationRegistration | Sponsorship


Schedule*

All times listed in CST.

7:00 am – 8:00 am  Registration and Breakfast
8:00 am – 9:00 am Business Meeting
9:00 am – 9:15 am Break
9:15 am – 10:15 am Lecture: Empathy and Emotional Communication after Right Hemisphere Stroke

Argye Hillis
Johns Hopkins

ASHA CEUs: 0.1

10:15 am – 10:45 am

Lecture: Intersectionality of Race and Right Hemisphere Brain Damage
Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Duke University School of Medicine

ASHA CEUs: 0.05

10:45 am – 11:15 am

Lecture: Are you REDI for “Heterogeneity”?
ANCDS Race, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (REDI) Committee

ASHA CEUs: 0.05

11:15 am – 11:30 am Break
11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Lecture: Neural Correlates of Aprosdia in RHD and Treatment Implications
Shannon Sheppard
Chapman University

Alexandra Zezinka Durfee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP 
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

ASHA CEUs: 0.1

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm Lunch
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Lecture: Using the RHDBank to Advance Understanding of Discourse after RHD
Melissa Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Nazareth College

Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Duke University School of Medicine

ASHA CEUs: 0.1

3:00 pm – 3:15 pm Break
3:15 pm – 4:00 pm

Lecture: Apragmatism
Margaret Lehman Blake
University of Houston

ASHA CEUs: 0.075

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Panel Discussion: A Call to Action: RHD Education
Margaret Lehman Blake, Melissa Johnson, Jamila Minga, Shannon Sheppard, and Alexandra Zezinka Durfee

ASHA CEUs: 0.075

*Subject to change.

 


Session Details

9:15 am – 10:15 am

Lecture: Empathy and Emotional Communication after Right Hemisphere Stroke

Speaker:
Hillis
Argye Hillis

Johns Hopkins

Abstract: This presentation will report studies of people with acute right hemisphere stroke, and how their lesions have affected affective empathy and expression of emotions through prosody.

Objectives:
The learner will be able to:

  1. Describe deficits in emotional empathy after right hemisphere (RH) stroke.
  2. Report the lesions associated with impaired empathy.
  3. Characterize impairments in affective prosody expression after RH stroke.
  4. Describe lesions associated with impairments in affective prosody expression.

Speaker Bio: Argye E. Hillis is a Professor of Neurology, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, and Cognitive Science at Johns Hopkins.  She serves as the Executive Vice Chair of Neurology, Director of the Cerebrovascular Division, and the Director of the Center for Excellence in Stroke Detection and Treatment.  She began her career as a Speech-Language Pathologist and Director of Neurological Rehabilitation, focusing on studies of novel treatments of aphasia and communication disorders after right hemisphere stroke.  She also studied Cognitive Neuropsychology in the Cognitive Science Department at Johns Hopkins, where she later became a faculty member.  Her research focused on identifying the cognitive processes underlying language, prosody, and spatial representations through the study of aphasia, aprosody, and hemispatial neglect, and how these investigations might help focus rehabilitation.  Dr. Hillis then completed medical training and neurology residency at Johns Hopkins, and integrated her training in the fields of Speech-Language Pathology and Cognitive Science with Neurology to continue her investigations of aphasia and right hemisphere cognitive and communicative impairments and how they recover.  Her research combines longitudinal task-related and task-free functional imaging and structural imaging with detailed cognitive and language assessments to reveal the dynamic neural networks that underlie language and cognitive functions, such as empathy and prosody.  Her lab studies changes from the acute stage of stroke through the first year of recovery, to improve our understanding how language and other cognitive functions recover after stroke and how to facilitate recovery.  She also leads clinical trials of innovative treatment approaches for treatment of post-stroke aphasia and Primary Progressive Aphasia.

Speaker Disclosures:
Financial: Dr. Hillis has no relevant financial conflicts to disclose.
Non-Financial: Dr. Hillis has no relevant non-financial conflicts to disclose.

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10:15 am – 10:45 am

Lecture: Intersectionality of Race and Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

Speaker:
Minga
Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Duke University School of Medicine

Abstract: Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) results in pragmatic language deficits that have a cultural basis.  This presentation will summarize findings from a pilot study exploring the intersectionality of race on one pragmatic aspect of language, information gathering, after right hemisphere brain damage.

Objectives:
The learner will be able to:

  1. Discuss intersectionality when considering health disparities in right hemisphere brain damage.
  2. Describe the potential influence of race on information gathering.

Speaker Bio: Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Communication Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine.  Her primary research focuses on investigating the impact of right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) on pragmatic communication performance and the development of population sensitive measures for determination of rehabilitation needs.  It is her long-term research goal to contribute to the increased recognition and distinction of the functional impact of stroke based on hemisphere of lesion by developing a comprehensive expertise in language production deficits and representative diagnostic markers as a precursor for engineering assessments and treatment protocols to enhance the functional integration of persons with right hemisphere brain damage into their respective communities.  Dr. Minga has relevant financial relationships with Duke University School of Medicine [salary support], the National Institutes of Health [Extramural grants: NIH/NIDCD 3R01-DC008524-11S1, NIH 2K12-HD043446-16, and NIH-NIMHD-RCMI 5U54MD012392-03], and the Whitehead Scholar Award [Internal Duke School of Medicine Grant].  She is co-developer of the RHDBank and a founding member of the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative.

Speaker Disclosures:
Financial: Dr. Minga receives a salary from Duke University School of Medicine.  She receives grant funding from NIH-NIDCD and the Whitehead Scholar Fellowship Award – Duke University School of Medicine.  She has received an honoraria from ANCDS for this presentation.
Non-Financial: Dr. Minga co-developed the RHDBank and the RHDBank Protocol.

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10:45 am – 11:15 am

Lecture: Are you REDI for “Heterogeneity”?

Speakers:
ANCDS Race, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (REDI) Committee

Alaina S. Davis, Ph.D, CCC-SLP/L, CBIST
Howard University

Ana Rivera, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Ramani Voleti, M.S., CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS
Gebbie Clinic at Syracuse University

Sucheta Kamath, M.S., CCC-SLP
ExQ®; Full PreFrontal®: Exposing the Mysteries of Executive Function

Yalian Pei, M.A., SLP-CF
University of Georgia

Abstract: This session will address race, equity, diversity, and inclusion by first discussing the status of population samples in SLP research focused on neurologically based communication disorders, including right hemisphere disorder.  The benefits and challenges associated with homogenous versus heterogeneous research populations and the impact on clinical practice will be discussed.  The presenters and audience will engage in solution-based discussion to increase diversity and inclusion in research focused on neurologically based communication disorders.

Objectives:
The learner will be able to:

  1. Discuss statistics related to population samples in SLP research focused on neurologically based communication disorders.
  2. Identify the benefits and challenges associated with homogenous versus heterogeneous research populations and the impact on clinical practice.
  3. Develop and implement a plan to address heterogeneity in SLP research focused on neurologically based communication disorders.

Speaker Bios: Alaina S. Davis, Ph.D, CCC-SLP/L, CBIST, is an Assistant Professor at Howard University and a Certified Brain Injury Specialist Trainer.  She has expertise in cognitive-communication disorders associated with TBI.  Dr. Davis is the Lead Speech-Language Pathologist on the HU Concussion Management Team which collaborates with her research and clinical lab, the Center for Cognitive-Communicative Skills (CCC Skills).  In the CCC Skills, her research focuses on adolescents and adults with sport-related concussion and return-to-learn/play/activity.  Dr. Davis’ work addresses cognitive and communication styles of adolescents and adults who are racially and ethnically diverse.  She co-hosts a podcast called Sunday Dinner with Drs. Stanford and Davis in which she leads a series called "Brain Injury Chronicles", telling the stories of persons with concussion and its effect on their lives.

Ana Rivera, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, Dallas campus.  In 2017, she successfully completed her PhD in Speech Language and Hearing Sciences from the University of Florida.  She teaches courses in clinical neuroscience, adult neurogenic communication disorders, and cultural responsiveness.  Her research interests are neurogenic communication disorders and bilingualism.  Dr. Rivera has a passion for assessment of linguistically diverse populations.  She collaborates with other professionals to provide the best services for bilingual/multilingual individuals across the lifespan.

Ramani Voleti, M.S., CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS, is an associate teaching professor and speech language pathologist at the Gebbie Clinic at Syracuse University.  Her clinical and research interests include acquired neurogenic speech/language disorders, dysphagia, and voice disorders in adults.  She teaches courses in neurogenic communication disorders and professional issues in medical settings.  She is board certified in neurogenic communication disorders in adults.

Sucheta Kamath, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a celebrated motivational speaker, an award-winning speech-language pathologist, a TEDx speaker, and a tech-entrepreneur who has created ExQ®; a cloudbased digital curriculum for the middle and high school students designed to directly personalize learning and build Executive Function skills through games, error analysis, and metacognitive lessons.  She is the host of the podcast Full PreFrontal®: Exposing the Mysteries of Executive Function; where her invited guests range from neuroscientists, researchers, educators, learning specialists, journalists, and leaders.  Finally, Sucheta serves on many non-profit boards and is deeply committed to racial healing and interfaith community dialogue.  For the past four years, she founded and currently runs (along with her GSHA colleagues) GSHA Gives!, a free communication and Executive Function job-readiness training program for previously homeless, incarcerated, and disenfranchised men in inner-city Atlanta.

Yalian Pei, M.A., SLP-CF, is a PhD candidate at the University of Georgia.  Pei is a UGA College of Education Research Scholar Awardee and also was a student fellow of the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences in 2021.  Her research focuses on neurogenic communication disorders, especially reading and learning after traumatic brain injury.

Speaker Disclosures:
Alaina S. Davis, Ph.D, CCC-SLP/L, CBIST
Financial: Dr. Davis receives a salary from Howard University, Stony Brook University, and her private practice, Overall Neuro Rehab, LLC.
Non-Financial: Dr. Davis is on the Board of Advisors for the nonprofit, Head to Speech.

Ana Rivera, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Financial: Dr. Rivera receives a salary from the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences.
Non-Financial: Dr. Rivera does not have any relevant non-financial conflicts to disclose.

Ramani Voleti, M.S., CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS
Financial: Mrs. Voleti receives a salary from Syracuse University and is a board certified member and chair of the certification committee of the ANCDS.
Non-Financial: Mrs. Voleti does not have any relevant non-financial conflicts to disclose.

Sucheta Kamath, M.S., CCC-SLP
Financial: Mrs. Kamath receives a salary from ExQ and private practice, Cerebral Matters.
Non-Financial: Mrs. Kamath does not have any relevant non-financial conflicts to disclose.

Yalian Pei, M.A., SLP-CF
Financial: Ms. Pei receives a salary from the Mountain Region Speech and Hearing Center.
Non-Financial: Ms. Pei does not have any relevant non-financial conflicts to disclose.

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11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Lecture: Neural Correlates of Aprosdia in RHD and Treatment Implications

Speakers: 
Sheppard
Shannon Sheppard

Chapman University

Durfee
Alexandra Zezinka Durfee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Abstract: Emotional prosody is the variations to pitch, volume, rate, and rhythm of speech to convey emotions.  Difficulty comprehending emotional prosody is termed receptive aprosodia, which is an understudied but common consequence of right hemisphere stroke.  In this talk we will discuss the neurological basis and subtypes of receptive aprosodia as well as new emerging treatment research.

Objectives:
The learner will be able to:

  1. Describe receptive aprosodic deficits following right hemisphere stroke.
  2. Explain consequences of aprosodia and the impact on quality of life and relationships.
  3. Describe neural correlates of receptive aprosodia.
  4. Explain current status and future directions for aprosodia treatment research.

Speaker Bios: Dr. Sheppard is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Chapman University, and the Director of the Cognition Rehabilitation And Neuroscience In Atypical Language Lab (CRANIAL Lab).  Her research interests include examining the fundamental cognitive and linguistic processes that characterize the deficit in patients with aphasia and primary progressive aphasia (PPA).  She also studies communication deficits associated with right hemisphere stroke, with an emphasis on understanding difficulties expressing and understanding emotional prosody.

Alexandra Zezinka Durfee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She works in Dr. Argye Hillis’s Stroke Cognitive Outcomes and REcovery (SCORE) Lab investigating longitudinal recovery of emotional aprosodia following right hemisphere stroke.  Dr. Durfee is also developing treatment approaches for emotional aprosodia that aim to maximize behavioral outcomes and social participation as well as understand functional neural recovery in the same population.

Speaker Disclosures:
Shannon Sheppard
Financial:
 Dr. Sheppard has no relevant financial conflicts to disclose.
Non-Financial: Dr. Sheppard has no relevant non-financial conflicts to disclose.

Alexandra Zezinka Durfee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Financial: Dr. Durfee receives a salary from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She receives grant funding from NIDCD.  She has received an honoraria from ANCDS for this presentation.
Non-Financial: Dr. Durfee is a member of ASHA, the ANCDS RHD Writing Group, and the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative.

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2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Lecture: Using the RHDBank to Advance Understanding of Discourse after RHD

Speakers: 
Johnson

Melissa Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Nazareth College

Minga
Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Duke University School of Medicine

Abstract: Coming soon!

Objectives:
The learner will be able to:

  1. Describe the RHDBank and protocol.
  2. Discuss applications of the RHDBank protocol for research in people with RHD.
  3. Apply the RHDBank protocol when assessing people with RHD.

Speaker Bios: Melissa Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor at Nazareth College where she teaches and provides clinical education in the area of neurogenic communication disorders.  Her research interests are in understanding the impacts of right hemisphere brain damage on cognitive-communication abilities, especially in the area of pragmatics, as well as co-delivered music and speech therapy for people with aphasia.  She is a co-developer of the RHDBank, a founding member of the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative, and a co-developer of the educational website, righthemisphere.org.

Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor and speech-language pathologist with primary research interests are adult neurogenic communication disorders following stroke and stroke rehabilitation outcomes.  Specifically, she is interested in investigating the impact of right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) on pragmatic communication performance and the development of population sensitive measures for determination of rehabilitation needs.  It is her long-term research goal to contribute to the increased recognition and distinction of the functional impact of stroke based on hemisphere of lesion by developing a comprehensive expertise in language production deficits and representative diagnostic markers as a precursor for engineering assessments and treatment protocols to enhance functional integration of persons with brain damage into their respective communities.  This goal stems from her clinical experience providing adult neurogenic rehabilitation services in acute, subacute, and skilled rehabilitation settings.  Other research interests include cultural language analysis, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and health disparities.  Dr. Minga has relevant financial relationships with Duke University School of Medicine [salary support], the National Institutes of Health [Extramural grants: NIH/NIDCD 3R01-DC008524-11S1, NIH 2K12-HD043446-16, and NIH-NIMHD-RCMI 5U54MD012392-03], and the Whitehead Scholar Award [Internal Duke School of Medicine Grant].  She has a non-financial relationship with TalkBank as a co-developer of the RHDBank.

Speaker Disclosures:
Melissa Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Financial: Dr. Johnson has received an honoraria from ANCDS for this presentation.
Non-Financial: Dr. Johnson is a co-developer of the RHDBank.

Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Financial: Dr. Minga receives a salary from Duke University School of Medicine.  She receives grant funding from NIH-NIDCD and the Whitehead Scholar Fellowship Award – Duke University School of Medicine.  She has received an honoraria from ANCDS for this presentation.
Non-Financial: Dr. Minga co-developed the RHDBank and the RHDBank Protocol.

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3:15 pm – 4:00 pm

Lecture: Apragmatism

Speaker:
Blake
Margaret Lehman Blake
University of Houston

Abstract: Apragmatism is a new label for the communication disorders associated with right hemisphere brain damage, characterized by difficulties manipulating and processing linguistic, paralinguistic, and extralinguistic aspects of language within communicative contexts.  Preliminary conclusions from a systematic review of apragmatic impairments will be discussed.

Objectives:
The learner will be able to:

  1. Define apragmatism and the linguistic, paralinguistic and extralinguistic components.
  2. Describe the preliminary conclusions from the existing literature about apragmatic impairments.
  3. Identify common RHD disorders that are not included within the definition of apragmatism.

Speaker Bio: Margaret Lehman Blake is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Houston.  Her research focuses on cognitive-communication disorders associated with right hemisphere brain damage with the goal of understanding the underlying deficits and developing treatments.  She is the author of The Right Hemisphere and Disorders of Cognition and Communication, a founding member of the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative, and the co-creator of RightHemisphere.org.

Speaker Disclosures:
Financial: Dr. Blake receives a salary from University of Houston.  She receives royalties from Plural Publishing and Northern Speech Services.  She also receives grant funding from NIH-NIDCD.
Non-Financial: Dr. Blake is a founding member of the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative, a founding chair and current co-chair of the ANCDS Right Hemisphere Evidence-Based Writing Group, and co-creator of www.RightHemisphere.org.

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4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Panel Discussion: A Call to Action: RHD Education

Speakers:
Blake
Margaret Lehman Blake
University of Houston

Johnson
Melissa Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Nazareth College

Minga
Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Duke University School of Medicine

Sheppard
Shannon Sheppard

Chapman University

Durfee
Alexandra Zezinka Durfee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Abstract: Panel members will summarize current shortcomings of education about right hemisphere brain damage, the impact of apragmatic deficits, and propose steps that can be taken to improve education and clinical care.

Objectives:
The learner will be able to:

  1. Identify needs in education about RHD.
  2. List opportunities for improving education.
  3. Challenge yourself to make one change to increase education in your current setting.

Speaker Bios: Margaret Lehman Blake is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Houston.  Her research focuses on cognitive-communication disorders associated with right hemisphere brain damage with the goal of understanding the underlying deficits and developing treatments.  She is the author of The Right Hemisphere and Disorders of Cognition and Communication, a founding member of the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative, and the co-creator of RightHemisphere.org.

Melissa Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor at Nazareth College where she teaches and provides clinical education in the area of neurogenic communication disorders.  Her research interests are in understanding the impacts of right hemisphere brain damage on cognitive-communication abilities, especially in the area of pragmatics, as well as co-delivered music and speech therapy for people with aphasia.  She is a co-developer of the RHDBank, a founding member of the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative, and a co-developer of the educational website, righthemisphere.org.

Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Communication Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine.  Her primary research focuses on investigating the impact of right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) on pragmatic communication performance and the development of population sensitive measures for determination of rehabilitation needs.  It is her long-term research goal to contribute to the increased recognition and distinction of the functional impact of stroke based on hemisphere of lesion by developing a comprehensive expertise in language production deficits and representative diagnostic markers as a precursor for engineering assessments and treatment protocols to enhance the functional integration of persons with right hemisphere brain damage into their respective communities.  Dr. Minga has relevant financial relationships with Duke University School of Medicine [salary support], the National Institutes of Health [Extramural grants: NIH/NIDCD 3R01-DC008524-11S1, NIH 2K12-HD043446-16, and NIH-NIMHD-RCMI 5U54MD012392-03], and the Whitehead Scholar Award [Internal Duke School of Medicine Grant].  She is co-developer of the RHDBank and a founding member of the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative.

Dr. Sheppard is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Chapman University, and the Director of the Cognition Rehabilitation And Neuroscience In Atypical Language Lab (CRANIAL Lab).  Her research interests include examining the fundamental cognitive and linguistic processes that characterize the deficit in patients with aphasia and primary progressive aphasia (PPA).  She also studies communication deficits associated with right hemisphere stroke, with an emphasis on understanding difficulties expressing and understanding emotional prosody.

Alexandra Zezinka Durfee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She works in Dr. Argye Hillis’s Stroke Cognitive Outcomes and REcovery (SCORE) Lab investigating longitudinal recovery of emotional aprosodia following right hemisphere stroke.  Dr. Durfee is also developing treatment approaches for emotional aprosodia that aim to maximize behavioral outcomes and social participation as well as understand functional neural recovery in the same population.

Speaker Disclosures:
Margaret Lehman Blake
Financial: Dr. Blake receives a salary from University of Houston.  She receives royalties from Plural Publishing and Northern Speech Services.  She also receives grant funding from NIH-NIDCD.
Non-Financial: Dr. Blake is a founding member of the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative, a founding chair and current co-chair of the ANCDS Right Hemisphere Evidence-Based Writing Group, and co-creator of www.RightHemisphere.org.

Melissa Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Financial: Dr. Johnson has received an honoraria from ANCDS for this presentation.
Non-Financial: Dr. Johnson is a co-developer of the RHDBank.

Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Financial: Dr. Minga receives a salary from Duke University School of Medicine.  She receives grant funding from NIH-NIDCD and the Whitehead Scholar Fellowship Award – Duke University School of Medicine.  She has received an honoraria from ANCDS for this presentation.
Non-Financial: Dr. Minga co-developed the RHDBank and the RHDBank Protocol.

Shannon Sheppard
Financial: Dr. Sheppard has no relevant financial conflicts to disclose.
Non-Financial: Dr. Sheppard has no relevant non-financial conflicts to disclose.

Alexandra Zezinka Durfee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Financial: Dr. Durfee receives a salary from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She receives grant funding from NIDCD.  She has received an honoraria from ANCDS for this presentation.
Non-Financial: Dr. Durfee is a member of ASHA, the ANCDS RHD Writing Group, and the International Right Hemisphere Collaborative.

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 ASHA CEUs

CEU

Live Program Completion Requirements: Variable/partial credit is available for up to 0.55 ASHA CEUs.  You must attend the entirety of a lecture for it to be counted towards your ASHA CEU total.  Attendance will be verified before you are recommended for ASHA CEUs.

If you would like to receive ASHA CEUs, please complete and submit the program evaluation form indicating which lectures you attended.  Your evaluation form must be submitted by Friday, December 2, 2022 at 11:59 PM (CST).

If you have any questions about ASHA CEUs or encounter difficulty submitting your survey, please contact [email protected].

Recorded Lecture Sessions: For those who were unable to attend the live event, an archived version of lectures will be made available to order for on-demand viewing.

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Registration

Registration fee includes Educational & Scientific Program, continental breakfast, Honors Luncheon, and breaks.

  Late Registration (After Nov. 2)
ANCDS Member $275
Non-Member* $285
Student $110

*Non-Members: Apply for membership today and receive the discounted member rate! Complete the New Member Application to receive the discount and get access to all the ANCDS member benefits!

ANCDS will require proof of COVID vaccination (initial vaccines, not boosters) at Scientific Meeting registration in New Orleans, and masking will be required for all ANCDS activities.

View Cancellation Policy

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Sponsorship

Our mission is to offer an affordable educational and scientific meeting for anyone with a clinical and/or research interest in neurologic communication disorders.  To accomplish this goal, we are seeking sponsorships from ANCDS members, interested individuals, and companies that provide goods and/or services associated with the clinical management of neurologic communication impairments.

We ask you to consider partnering with ANCDS to help provide relevant continuing education at a reasonable price and to advance the professional goals of our members.  Your sponsorship is greatly appreciated and will be recognized as noted in the sponsorship kit. There are no limits for the number of sponsors at each level.

  • Gold - $1500
  • Silver - $1000
  • Bronze - $750
  • Green - $500

Become a Sponsor

Thank you to the Annual Meeting Sponsors!*

2022 Gold Sponsor

 

2022 Silver Sponsor

*ANCDS does not endorse specific companies or products. 

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